Meet The Principal: Bryan Edge (File Photos) PDF Print E-mail
News - Local News
Thursday, 05 October 2017 14:14
By GENE ESPY
Editor
(Editor’s Note: This is the seventh in a series of stories about the principals in the Chattooga and Trion School Systems. The stories began with the newest principals in both systems and now are about principals that have been at their posts longer. This week, the story is about Trion High School Principal Bryan Edge. Next week, we will follow with the final feature in the series about Chattooga High School Principal Jeff Martin.)
 
Bryan Edge has always been a Bulldog but went from being a red Bulldog to being a blue Bulldog at Trion.
He was born in Cedartown and grew up there and graduated at Cedartown High School in 1994.
From there he went to Presbyterian College for his undergraduate degree. He received his Masters Degree from Piedmont College and received his Specialist Degree through Lincoln Memorial.
His first teaching job was at St. Clair County High School in Alabama for one year after graduating at Presbyterian College and taught Algebra I in 1998. He taught a year at Ashville High School (Ala.) for one year and taught math there. He then went to Rockmart Elm Street Middle School for two years and taught seventh grade math.
After Rockmart he came to Trion and has been there the rest of his career.
When he first came to Trion he taught Algebra I and Algebra II.
He got into administration in January 2008 as assistant principal at Trion High School.
Edge coached football all the years when he taught until he got into administration. He was an assistant coach for basketball for awhile, head baseball coach for one year, and his wife’s assistant coach for soccer for several years, all at Trion.
“I miss coaching,” Edge told The News. “Especially with football because I played high school and college and it was a part of my life for so long. I used to tell people that coaching football was as close as I could get to playing again.”
He said he also missed the interaction with the kids as a coach.
“I don’t miss the time,” he added.
Asked what education means to him, Edge said, “To me, education is one, about making relationships with people. Our goal is to give kids the tools they need to be successful and be happy. If in five years a kid is able to come back and talk to us and they have a job they like and are able to lead a successful life, then we have achieved what we need to achieve as a school.”
Asked what he thought makes a good school, Principal Edge said that number one it goes back to building relationships.
“I feel like that one of the reasons that we are able to be as successful as we are here is I can get out and see the majority of my student body throughout the day so there is a personal connection between the administration and the students, a personal connection between the teachers and the students. I think that is where it needs to start.”
He said as far as being successful, you have to have a connection and then he thought that you have to sell through that relationship a commitment to hard work with the staff and the students and trying to take opportunities to look at what you are doing well and what you are not doing well. 
“Correct the things that are not as good,” Edge added. “I look at everything very much like I did as a coach. You don’t have to always totally throw everything out but you always need to be looking at what you are doing and is there something we can do better.”
He said that being the principal at Trion High School is very unique in a very positive way.
“To me, it is like stepping back in time,” Principal Edge said. “You have this small environment which is pretty rare in most places and you have this very strong connection with the community which has disappeared as communities have grown and you have three or four or five schools that are pulling kids. You have lost some of that. Here, it is one thing that has helped us be successful is that we still have that mom, dad, granddaddy, grandmother.
You go back with a lot of kids; their families have been here a long time. That tradition is always something that is helpful to have and build from, he said.
Asked if he retired today, what he would like to be remembered for in his years as being an educator, Edge said, “I hope that whenever I do retire, that kids will remember that I helped make a difference in their life. That is why I got into education. That’s what I would I’d like.”
Edge and his wife, Rachel, who is a teacher at Trion Middle School live in Trion and they have two children, Anna, a seventh grader at Trion Middle School and Molly, a fifth grader at Trion Elementary School.
 
 
 
 
 


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